Communities served

  • The John Paladin Law Office serves all California counties, including the following communities:
  • Alameda County. Alameda is Spanish for “avenue shaded by trees” or “cottonwood grove”.
  • Alpine County. Location high in the Sierra Nevada; alpine refers to the Alps or other mountains.
  • Amador County. Named after Jose Maria Amador (1794–1883), a soldier, rancher, and miner who, along with several Native Americans, established a successful gold mining camp near present-day Amador City in 1848.
  • Butte County, named after Butte Creek, which is named for Sutter Buttes (“isolated hill with steep sides and a flat top”) in Sutter County.
  • Calaveras County. Calaveras is Spanish for “skulls”.
  • Colusa County. Named after the Rancho Colus land grant from Mexico.
  • Contra Costa County. Located across San Francisco Bay from San Francisco; contra costa is Spanish for “opposite coast”.
  • Del Norte County. Located along California’s northern border; del norte is Spanish for “northern”.
  • El Dorado County. Named after El Dorado, a mythical city of gold, owing to the area’s significance in the California Gold Rush.
  • Fresno County. Fresno is Spanish for “ash tree”.
  • Glenn County. Named after Hugh J. Glenn, a California businessman and politician.
  • Humboldt County. Named after Alexander von Humboldt, a German naturalist and explorer.
  • Imperial County. Named after the Imperial Land Company.
  • Inyo County. Early settlers believed Inyo to be the native name for area mountains, but it may have been the name of a Mono Indian leader.
  • Kern County. Named after Edward Kern, cartographer for John C. Fremont’s 1845 expedition.
  • Kings County. Named after Kings River; original Spanish name Rio de los Santos Reyes (“River of the Holy Kings”).
  • Lake County. Named after Clear Lake.
  • Lassen County. Named after Peter Lassen, a Danish naturalist and explorer.
  • Los Angeles County. The city of Los Angeles name was derived from the original Spanish name El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Angeles del Río de Porciúncula (“The Village of Our Lady, the Queen of the Angels of the River of Porziuncola”).
  • Madera County. The city of Madera was named for the forested landscape; madera is Spanish for “wood”.
  • Marin County. Probably an abbreviation of Bahía de Nuestra Señora del Rosario la Marina, the Spanish name for area headlands along San Francisco Bay.
  • Mariposa County. The city of Mariposa was named after mariposa, Spanish for “butterfly”.
  • Mendocino County. Named after Antonio de Mendoza, first viceroy of New Spain.
  • Merced County. The city of Merced name was derived from the original Spanish name El Río de Nuestra Señora de la Merced (“River of Our Lady of Mercy”).
  • Modoc County, named after The Modoc people.
  • Mono County’s name was derived from Monachi, a Yokut name for native peoples of the Sierra Nevada.
  • Monterey County. Monterey is a Spanish portmanteau of monte (“hill”) and rey (“king”).
  • Napa County. Possibly derived from the Patwin word napo, meaning “home”.
  • Nevada County. Name derived from the phrase Sierra Nevada; nevada is Spanish for “snow-covered,” referencing the area’s high elevation. The neighboring state was named after the county, which was named after Nevada City.
  • Orange County. Named after oranges, which were widely cultivated in the area at the time the county was established.
  • Placer County. A placer is a deposit of sand or gravel in the bed of a river or lake, containing particles of valuable minerals. The name is a reference to the area being a center of the California Gold Rush.
  • Plumas County. Named after The Feather River; plumas is Spanish for “feathers”.
  • Riverside County, named for its location on the Santa Ana River.
  • Sacramento County, named after the Santisimo Sacramento (Spanish for “Most Holy Sacrament”).
  • San Benito County, named after Saint Benedict (Benito is a Spanish diminutive of Benedict).
  • San Bernardino County (City and County), named after Saint Bernardino of Siena (Spanish for Saint Bernardine).
  • San Diego County (City and County). Based on the Spanish name for Saint Didacus.
  • San Francisco (City and County), named after Saint Francis of Assisi (Spanish for Saint Francis).
  • San Joaquin County, based on the Spanish name for Saint Joachim, father of the Virgin Mary.
  • San Luis Obispo County (City and County), named after Saint Louis of Toulouse (Spanish for Saint Louis, the Bishop).
  • San Mateo County. Spanish for Saint Matthew.
  • Santa Barbara County (City and County). Spanish for Saint Barbara.
  • Santa Clara County (City and County). Named after Mission Santa Clara de Asís, which was based on the name Saint Clare of Assisi (Spanish for Saint Clare).
  • Santa Cruz County (City and County). Spanish for “holy cross”.
  • Shasta County. Based on Mount Shasta and the indigenous Shasta people.
  • Sierra County. Sierra is Spanish for “mountain range”, a reference to the area’s topography.
  • Siskiyou County. Based on the Siskiyou Mountains. Based on Native American words for “bob-tailed horse”, or French words for “six stones”.
  • Solano County. Named after Chief Solano of the Suisunes.
  • Sonoma County. Probably a Pomo term meaning “valley of the moon,” which references a native legend about spiritual activity in the area.
  • Stanislaus County. Named after the Stanislaus River, which was based on the name Estanislao, a native of the area when California was under Spanish and Mexican rule.
  • Sutter County. Named after John Sutter, a Swiss pioneer of California associated with the California Gold Rush.
  • Tehama County (City and County). Probably a Native American term describing the area or location.
  • Trinity County (City and County). Spanish for “trinity”.
  • Tulare County. Named after Tulare Lake, which is based on the tule rush (Schoenoplectus acutus) that grew in the marshes and sloughs along its shores.
  • Tuolumne County. Probably based on the native term talmalamne, which means “cluster of stone wigwams,” a reference to local cave dwelling tribes.
  • Ventura County (City and County). Derived from San Buenaventura, Spanish for St. Bonaventure.
  • Yolo County. Based on the Yolan people, a local Native American tribe.
  • Yuba County was named after the Yuba River by Captain John Sutter for the Maidu village Yubu, Yupu or Juba near the confluence of the Yuba and Feather rivers.

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